the art of becoming black in america

      II.   Restorative Justice through Artistic Expressions

The panel discussion is the second part of the symposium The Art of Becoming Black in America and will provide a framework for attendees to understand restorative justice through artistic expressions. 

Walton Muyumba                  Associate Professor, English

Nya McCarthy Brown             Assistant Professor, Contemporary Dance

Ansley Valentine                   Associate Professor, Theatre

Michael Wilkerson                 Director, Arts Administration 

Nikita Shokhov                      BFA, Artist, Filmmaker              

Kaila Austin                          BA, Art History and Painting

Anna Eve Evtiugina                 MA Arts Administration, independent curator

 

We'll feature a documentary "Mother/Son Conversations" by Nya McCarthy Brown and show preview of the 360 film "The Klaxon" by Nikita Shokhov and Anna Eve

 

Jakobi Williams

Associate Professor, African American and Diaspora Studies at IU whose research interests are centered on questions of resistance and social justice. His most recent book, From the Bullet to the Ballot: The Illinois Chapter of the Black Panther Party and Racial Coalition Politics in Chicago was published in 2013 by the University of North Carolina Press under its prestigious John Hope Franklin Series.
Prior to my research on Fred Hampton and the Illinois BPP, in 2003 I completed his first edited book, Revolutions of the Mind: Cultural Studies in the African Diaspora Project, 1996-2002. The work provides an eclectic sample of the essays, reviews, conference proceedings, and programs that defined the UCLA Cultural Studies in the African Diaspora Project (CSADP), funded by the Ford Foundation.


Malcolm Mobutu Smith

is an artist and teacher, Associate Professor of Ceramic and Art at Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana. His professional activities include lectures, workshops, personal exhibitions. His works are represented in numerous private and public collections such as FuLed International Ceramic Art Museum, Beijing, China; Indiana State Museum, etc. Sphere of his interests also includes art of graffiti, comic books and jazz.

www.malcolmmobutusmith.com


Michael Wilkerson

Educated as journalist and fiction writer, he was founding editor of literary magazine Indiana Review and the founding chair of the Alliance of Artists Communities. His research interests are spread to artists’ support, finances and the future of arts which has been presented at various conferences and published in the Journal of Arts Management, Law and Society and The Stanford Social Innovation Review. Currently he is Director of Arts Administration Programs at Indiana University.

Nzingha Kendall

is a PhD candidate in the Department of American Studies at IU Bloomington whose research focuses on black women experimental filmmakers. A number of her film series have screened at the IU Cinema, including Luchando: Women in Contemporary Latin America and Black Poets: A Change Is Gonna Come. Author of experimental shorts cycle: “Four seasons”, which includes: “Autumn Song”, “Summer Memorial”, “Springtime Plaint” and “Untitled (Winter)”. Winner of 2016-17 COLL DISS YR Fellowship for "Imperfect Independence: Black Women's Experimental Cinema"


Nyama McCarthy-Brown

joined the Department of Theater, Drama, and Contemporary Dance as an Assistant Professor of Contemporary Dance at Indiana University, in the fall of 2014. Nyama's research agenda is grounded in Social Justice; she synthesizes scholarship and creative practice to build an embodied and engaged body of research. In the fall of 2016, her first book, Dance Pedagogy for a Diverse World: Culturally Relevant Teaching in Theory, Research, and Practice will be released. This year she and colleague, Selene Carter were awarded the New Frontiers Experimentation Fellowship to attend the Urban Bush Women’s Summer Leadership Institute in Brooklyn, NY, and develop an original dance piece exploring intersections of race and gender within single parent families. Currently, Nyama is also developing research on Critical Dance Pedagogy funded by a grant from the College Arts and Humanities Institute (CAHI).

www.nyamamccarthybrown.com


Nikita Shokhov

is an international award-winning visual artist and filmmaker. In 2014 Shokhov was awarded World Press Photo prize.  Nikita Shokhov’s recent exhibitions include the Robert Wilson's Watermill Center in NY, GRAD gallery in London, 5th Photoquai Biennial in Paris, Moscow Museum of Modern Art, Manifesta 10 in St Petersburg, and the 6th Moscow Biennial of Contemporary Art. Interviews and features of his work have been published in The New York Times, China Newsweek, ImagineChina, The Guardian, Le Monde, Interview, Harper’s Bazaar Art, Courrier International, etc. Holds BFA from Rodchenko Art School.

www.nikita-shokhov.com

Walton Muyumba

Prof. Muyumba’s specialization and interests include African American literature, African Diaspora literature, late nineteenth and twentieth-century American literature, literary and arts criticism, creative nonfiction, Black Atlantic studies, jazz studies, cultural studies, pragmatism, and postcolonial studies.
Currently, he is working on a book about contemporary American literary art and popular music as well as building projects on John Edgar Wideman’s literary works and about ethnic American art in the age of terrorism. His scholarship has appeared in The Cambridge History of American Poetry, College Literature, The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics, The Oxford Handbook of Critical Improvisational Studies.  His criticism is frequently published in The Atlantic, The Chicago Tribune, The Crisis, The Los Angeles Review of Books, The New York Times, The New Republic, and Oxford American, among other outlets.


waltonmuyumba.com


Nyama McCarthy-Brown

joined the Department of Theater, Drama, and Contemporary Dance as an Assistant Professor of Contemporary Dance at Indiana University, in the fall of 2014. Nyama's research agenda is grounded in Social Justice; she synthesizes scholarship and creative practice to build an embodied and engaged body of research. In the fall of 2016, her first book, Dance Pedagogy for a Diverse World: Culturally Relevant Teaching in Theory, Research, and Practice will be released. This year she and colleague, Selene Carter were awarded the New Frontiers Experimentation Fellowship to attend the Urban Bush Women’s Summer Leadership Institute in Brooklyn, NY, and develop an original dance piece exploring intersections of race and gender within single parent families. Currently, Nyama is also developing research on Critical Dance Pedagogy funded by a grant from the College Arts and Humanities Institute (CAHI).

www.nyamamccarthybrown.com


Lauren Marie Hall

Lauren Hall has been working in literacy education and social justice youth development practices since 2008.
She created a speech and debate program, and hip-hop theatre program for middle and high school youth in New York as Program Director of the Liberty Partnership Program; she served as a Middle School English Teacher in Indianapolis; a Leadership for Educational Equity Fellow in Baltimore; and wrote curriculum for teachers across the U.S. in her role at The Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C. Currently works at Teach for America. For her MAA-MPA degree at IU she researched the impact that informal art practices have on civic engagement, social cohesion, and individual.